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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

5 edition of Salt-glazed stoneware in early America found in the catalog.

Salt-glazed stoneware in early America

Janine E. Skerry

Salt-glazed stoneware in early America

by Janine E. Skerry

  • 137 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Williamsburg, VA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Blue and white stoneware -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJanine E. Skerry and Suzanne Findlan Hood.
    ContributionsHood, Suzanne Findlan, 1975-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsNK4364 .S54 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23203048M
    ISBN 109780879352400
    LC Control Number2009014295
    OCLC/WorldCa318100504

    Author: Diana Edwards,Rodney Hampson; Publisher: Antique Collectors Club Dist ISBN: Category: Antiques & Collectibles Page: View: DOWNLOAD NOW» From its first introduction, in the early 16th century in the Westerwald, salt-glazed stoneware vessels, impermeable to liquids and made hygienic by their clear, lustrous silica glaze, vastly changed food storage and Salt Glazed stoneware became the dominant houseware of the United States of America from to By >, stoneware was being produced in virtually every American urban center, with potters from Baltimore, Maryland, in particular raising the craft to its ://

    Potters along the Ohio River were producing salt-glazed stoneware with cobalt blue decoration as early as the s (Fig. 1). Stoneware marked by Isaac Thomas (–c) and John and Ezekiel Wood (w–c) of Maysville (Figs. 2 and 3) and by James H. Miller (w–) of Brandenburg (Fig. 4) attests to their contribution to   Salt-glazed stoneware with cobalt blue decoration. 12 3/8 × 8 3/4 in. ( × cm) base (Base): 5 1/2 in.(14 cm) Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John Paul Remensnyder. Stoneware, made of clay containing silica and kaolin and fired at a higher temperature than earthenware, was first made in America early in the eighteenth century. Hard

      The presence of nearby stoneware clays gave rise to the New York state salt-glazed stoneware tradition that, by the early s, developed in villages and towns along the Hudson River. Shipped upriver, the clay returned downstream after being transformed into useful ceramic ://   Jack Troy, Pitcher, , salt glazed stoneware, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase,


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Salt-glazed stoneware in early America by Janine E. Skerry Download PDF EPUB FB2

This is the first comprehensive book on salt-glazed stoneware in Early America. Imported from Germany and England and domestically made, salt-glazed stoneware vessels were an integral part of daily life in America from the time of European settlement until the dawn of the last  › Books › Arts & Photography › Decorative Arts & Design.

Get this from a library. Salt-glazed stoneware in early America. [Janine E Skerry; Suzanne Findlan Hood] -- "Salt-glazed Stoneware in Early Americachronicles the traditions of stoneware imported from England and Germany as well as the often overlooked work of American potters during the eighteenth century.

Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America by Janine E. Skerry, Suzanne Findlen Hood Library Binding Book, pages See Other Available Editions Description Imported from Germany and England and domestically made, salt-glazed stoneware vessels were an integral part of daily life in America from the time of European settlement until the dawn of the last :// These picayune quibbles aside, Salt-glazed Stoneware in Early America provides a valuable summary of earlier published research and has an excellent bibliography of the works cited in the text, although a surprising omission is the first major work on German stoneware in the English language: M.

Solon’s two-volume The Ancient Art Stoneware of Salt-glazed Stoneware in Early America is a solid reference further enhanced with richly colored illustrations."-The Auction Exchange and Collectors News, "The authors' long study of the subject has resulted in a handsome and highly informative compendium on all things stoneware relating to early America, just as the title  › eBay › Books › Nonfiction.

"A must-have volume for all ceramic enthusiasts, Salt-glazed Stoneware in Early America is a long-overdue tribute to the often-neglected but indispensable role that stoneware played in the American context." - Robert Hunter, editor, Ceramics in America.

Features. By Janine E. Skerry and Suzanne Findlen Hood Reference/overview of early American Any "stoneware collector" like me collects forms like crocks, jugs, butter churns, pitchers, and various specialty items like banks, figures, etc.

I bought the book because I expected to see a significant amount of information and photos devoted to early stoneware made in NYC, Philadelphia, NJ, etc. -- where stoneware began in the :// Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America - Janine E.

Skerry - 洋書の購入は楽天ブックスで。全品送料無料!購入毎に「楽天スーパーポイント」が貯まってお得!みんなのレビュー・感想も満載。 White Salt-Glazed Stoneware of the British Isles. Woodbridge, Suffolk, Eng.: Antique Collectors’ Club, pp.; bw and color illus., 5 appendixes, bibliography, index.

$ (hardcover). I approach this book from the viewpoint of a collector with an interest in white salt-glazed stoneware and its contemporary British Stoneware has a coarse texture and is often decorated with a brown or gray salt glaze with blue decorations.

Salt glaze is the tell tale sign of a piece of antique stoneware and it is recognizable by the salty or pebbled surface on a stoneware crock. The use of salt glaze results in a rough texture on the surface of a stoneware :// Old Pots: Salt-Glazed Stoneware of the Greensboro-New Geneva Region: Phil Schaltenbrand, Everybody’s Press, Paul Cushman: The Work and Worlds of an Early 19th Century Albany Potter: W.

Douglas McCombs, et al., The Albany Institute of History & Art, Pfaltzgraff: America’s Potter I found this 18th century jug and others like it in a book I got from Colonial Williamsburg. Salt-Glazed Stoneware In Early America My work is not salt glazed, but I have attempted to make the jugs as close to the old pieces as possible.

This is the quart size. These jugs are made to be used and :// Salt Glaze Stoneware Georg Kreuzberg Seltzer Bottle Cinnamon Rhein Preussen $ Antique JAMES R. BEAM Brown Stoneware Glazed 11" POTTERY LIQUOR BOTTLE or  › eBay › Antiques › Decorative Arts › Ceramics & Porcelain › Jugs.

Book Accessories Children's Books Art & Photography Books Beaumont Brothers Salt Glazed Mini Stoneware Jug - Cobalt Blue Floral Decoration - - BBP Pottery TheNWpickerShop. From shop TheNWpickerShop. 5 out of 5 stars () reviews   Janine Skerry and Suzanne Hood, Salt-Glazed Stoneware in Early America, published by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in association with the University Press of New England, Amazon list at $ (currently on sale)   William Rogers, also known as the Poor Potter of Yorktown, produced salt glazed stoneware that looked a great deal like English brown stoneware (Barka ).

Potters like William Crolius and Johannes Remmey, working out of New York, manufactured blue and gray salt glazed stoneware that imitated Rhenish stonewares. Even into the early nineteenth Ceramics. Salt-glazed stoneware was made for suitable articles, and a tall round butter churn by Clarkson Crolius Senior, made aboutbelongs to the New York Historical Society.

At about the same date a pottery was set up to make cream ware to compete with imported Wedgwood, gave it the name of Tivoli Ware and advertised for orders and :// Stamped “H.C.

SMITH / ALEXA,” this salt-glazed stoneware jar was made in Alexandria, Virginia, for merchant Hugh C. Smith. The jar was thrown on a wheel and has a wide mouth that is only slightly smaller than the diameter of the base.

There is stamped “1/2” at Glazed America: a history of the doughnut written by Paul R. Mullins was an alright book. The booked was really basic and firm on facts about doughnuts. It was boring to read and was tough to finish because of the dullness of the :// Hume, Ivor Noel.

Early English Delftware from London and Virginia. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Virginia. Mellor, Maureen. Pots and People that Have Shaped the Heritage of Medieval and Later England. Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Skerry, Janine E. and Suzanne Findlen Hood. Stalt-Glazed Stoneware in Early ://.

Early American Stoneware decorated, incised, ceramic, clay, pottery, salt glazed,crocks, Cushman Crolius Capron Albany! Warren F. Hartmann Specializing in Early American Stoneware [email protected]   Stoneware Water Cooler. The presence of nearby stoneware clays gave rise to the New York state salt-glazed stoneware tradition that, by the early s, developed in villages and towns along the Hudson River.

Shipped upriver, the clay returned downstream after being transformed into useful ceramic ://Although early, brown edged dipped white salt-glazed pieces stayed in production through much of the 18th century.

Molded plate rim motifs after included "dot, diaper and basket" (specimen #’s,), "bead and reel"(#’s), and "barley" (#’s ,).